Live coverage and news from the Senate


House impeachment managers, lead by Congressman Jamie Raskin, Lead Manager, proceed through the Capitol Rotunda on February 9 in Washington, DC.
House impeachment managers, lead by Congressman Jamie Raskin, Lead Manager, proceed through the Capitol Rotunda on February 9 in Washington, DC. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

The second Senate impeachment trial of former President Trump is underway, and multiple key players will take the spotlight throughout various moments of the trial. 

These are the key people to watch:

House impeachment lawyers: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi named nine members of her caucus to be impeachment managers to argue the Democrats’ case in the Senate. They will have up to 8 hours to make their case both today and tomorrow. Read about them here.

The impeachment managers are: Reps. Jamie Raskin of Maryland (lead manager), Diana DeGette of Colorado, David Cicilline of Rhode Island, Joaquin Castro of Texas, Eric Swalwell of California, Ted Lieu of California, Stacey Plaskett of the US Virgin Islands, Joe Neguse of Colorado and Madeleine Dean of Pennsylvania.

Trump’s lawyers: David Schoen and Bruce L. Castor Jr. head the legal team for former President Trump. Schoen was on the team of lawyers representing Roger Stone in the appeal of his conviction related to issues the former Trump adviser took with the jury. Castor, meanwhile, is a well-known attorney in Pennsylvania who previously served as Montgomery County district attorney. Trump’s defense team will also have the opportunity to argue their case for up to 16 hours spread over two days.

Senator presiding over case: Sen. Patrick Leahy is presiding over the trial, and is expected to adhere largely to the script of Chief Justice John Roberts. But unlike when the robe-clad Roberts oversaw then-President Trump’s 2020 trial, Leahy will routinely slip into his senator role for votes, including on whether to convict or acquit the former president of inciting the deadly Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol.

The 80-year-old Vermont Democrat — who is the chamber’s president pro tempore, or the longest serving senator of the majority party — could also end up voting on knotty motions related to evidence and witnesses.

Jurors: The senators are serving as the jury and they will deliberate whether to convict or acquit the former President. Conviction requires two-thirds of senators present to offer “guilty” votes. Two-thirds is 67 senators, which would require 17 Republican votes. If Trump is convicted, there would be a subsequent vote on whether to bar him from further office. This would require only a simple majority — that’s 50 votes.



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